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PLUGGED IN Budget for Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Plugged In, moves Wednesdays, as a premium package of technology, gaming, social media and entertainment stories targeted toward 18- to 34-year-old readers.

To subscribe, please call Rick DeChantal at 866-280-5210 or rdechantal@tribpub.com.

^STAY CONNECTED<

You can have the Plugged In budget emailed to you each week. Just send an email request to editor Johnnie Miller-Cleaves at jmillercleaves@tribpub.com

^TOP STORIES<

^Would you eat lab-created fish? This startup is carving new path in 'alt-meat' industry<

PLG-LAB-CREATED-FISH:SD — It's official: alternative meat has gone mainstream.

Vegetarian creations like the Impossible Burger — which look and taste like real meat — are the big headliners, with companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods leading the pack. Just this month, these startups scored multi-billion dollar valuations and mega-deals with fast food chains, igniting the plant-based "foodtech" industry.

But there's another area of food science fast on their heels: lab-grown meat. And San Diego is home to the newest player.

In a small laboratory in Sorrento Valley, scientists at BlueNalu are growing fish parts — just the muscle and fat — from cells. The tissue will one day be stacked into familiar shapes like freshly caught Mahi-mahi fillets, red snapper or flaked tuna using something akin to a 3D printer. Instead of printing plastic, the scientists are using ink made of cells.

2100 by Brittany Meiling in San Diego. MOVED

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^Could renting an apartment someday be as easy as booking a hotel?<

^PLG-APP-APARTMENTRENTING:SJ—<Anth Georgiades remembers as a young college student camping out overnight to land a coveted apartment. He suffered through more discomfort and indignity searching for shelter during graduate school.

At Harvard Business School, Georgiades decided to start a company that could take the pain out of renting an apartment for both landlords and tenants.

During his second year at school, Georgiades scheduled all his classes on Mondays and Tuesdays, and spent the rest of the week working on his startup.

1100 by Louis Hansen. MOVED

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^VIDEO GAMES<

^'Atelier Lulua' continues spirit of cult role-playing games<

^PLG-GAMEREVIEW-ATELIERLULUA:CC—<The "Atelier" franchise isn't as popular as the heavy hitters of the Japanese role-playing game genre, but it has an intense following among players. That fandom has been strong enough to spawn 20 main titles.

Although that can be intimidating, newcomers don't need to play every entry. Each stands alone on their own merit. The latest in the line is "Atelier Lulua: The Scion of Arland," an entry focused on Elmerulia Frixell, who is the daughter the protagonist in the first game of the "Arland" series. (Yes, there are so many "Atelier" games that there are series within the series.)

500 by Gieson Cacho. MOVED

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Game Informer Top 10 no longer moves on the Tribune News Service wires.

^APPS, SITES & TIPS<

^An app to look at that mole? Dermatologists advise caution<

^HEALTH-APP-DERMATOLOGY:TB—<While snapping a photo of a suspicious mole with a phone and uploading it to an app might seem like the swiftest way to a diagnosis, dermatologists say users should be wary of such technology, especially when it comes to screening for skin cancer.

Several apps allow users to provide a list of symptoms and an image of their skin, whether it be a changing mole or an itchy rash, and submit it — for a fee — to an online dermatologist.

650 by Kate Thayer. MOVED

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^Orlando company turns learning the elements into virtual reality game<

^PLG-VIRTUALREALITY-GAME:OS—<A Central Florida company behind a virtual reality game that teaches students about the elements is in line for a $225,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

The company, called Not Suspicious, has created the game TableCraft. Its founders expect to learn this month whether they will receive the financial boost as they build out their educational technology game.

TableCraft is part of a growing trend of products that use VR technology to help teach students about various subjects.

550 by Marco Santana. MOVED

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^TECH BUZZ<

^Orlando company turns learning the elements into virtual reality game<

^PLG-VIRTUALREALITY-GAME:OS—<A Central Florida company behind a virtual reality game that teaches students about the elements is in line for a $225,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

The company, called Not Suspicious, has created the game TableCraft. Its founders expect to learn this month whether they will receive the financial boost as they build out their educational technology game.

TableCraft is part of a growing trend of products that use VR technology to help teach students about various subjects.

550 by Marco Santana. MOVED

PHOTO

^PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY<

^Gadgets: This might not be a gadget, but it will improve you outdoor experience<

^PLG-GADGETS:MCT—<We all have our pet peeves and one of mine is bugs. I hate 'em. I can have the best company with the best music playing on the world's best Bluetooth speaker, but when those bugs invade, I'm done.

So when I got an invite to try a selection of Sawyer insect repellents I thought even though it's not a gadget I typically cover in this space, it can help the effectiveness of the electronic devices we all enjoy.

650 by Gregg Ellman. MOVED

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^CNET: The best graduation gifts for a first apartment<

^PLG-CNET-GRADUATIONGIFTS:MCT—<Commencement, of course, is not an end, but a beginning. And one of the things that commences after commencement is finding a new place to live. Which will need to be outfitted in some of the latest modern conveniences. Here, gift giver, is where you can pitch in. These are four of CNET's top picks for tech gifts that any recent grad can put to good use.

600 . MOVED

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^Jim Rossman: Best practices for keeping your phone's battery happy and healthy<

^PLG-ROSSMAN-PHONEBATTERY:DA—<I was part of an online conversation this week about the best way to charge your cellphone.

Is it better to keep the battery as full as you can, or should you regularly run it all the way down to zero before you charge up?

I read as much as I could find online to get everyone's ideas of the best practices.

Most tech gadgets use lithium-ion batteries, which weigh less and last longer than older battery types.

600 by Jim Rossman. MOVED

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^WHAT IS PLUGGED IN?<

Plugged In is a weekly package of technology-related columns and art targeted toward readers ages 18 to 34. It brings you the best reviews and reporting on video games product news on the rapidly advancing world of personal technology from CNET, gadget reviews by techie Gregg Ellman, and more from the world of electronic entertainment!

Text moves Wednesdays on AP and is posted Wednesdays to our Website ( http://www.TribuneNewsService.com/pluggedin/pluggedinlive.php ). All photos and illustrations are available Wednesdays on Tribune News Service ( http://www.TribuneNewsService.com/pluggedin/pluggedinphotos.php ).

^FOR MORE INFORMATION<

You can subscribe to the Plugged In package or purchase the items a la carte on Tribune News Service at www.TribuneNewsService.com.

To subscribe, please call Rick DeChantal at 866-280-5210 or rdechantal@tribpub.com

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Questions? Suggestions? Contact Plugged In editor Johnnie Miller-Cleaves at jmillercleaves@tribpub.com

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2019 Tribune Content Agency

Not for publication or retransmission without permission of Tribune News Service.

Copyright 2019 Tribune Content Agency.

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