Doc’s bad rap undeserved

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U.S. should back off

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Headline a misrepresentation

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What happened to progress

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Mountain Lions not a threat

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Farm stories

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Pipeline conundrum

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Downtown not dead

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Cooperating for MH370

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Taking a stand on NeSa

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Russ Batenhorst Green thumb sadly turns black, falls off


The small Venus fly trap caught my eyes as I walked through the potted plant section at a hardware store one Monday afternoon. I could swear I heard it say “buy me,” the same way Audrey II in “Little Shop of Horrors” boomed “feed me.” While I held the little plant with five bright green heads, pink mouths and big sharp teeth I thought of my past growing experiences. The success rate has varied. 

If survival were dependent on my gardening skills, there’s a fat chance I’d be dead. And if not dead, I definitely wouldn’t be fat. I can grow tomatoes, chives and strawberries. Though that lack of variety doesn’t offer much nutritional value, I can whip up some tasty strawberry jam.


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Patrick White Anticipation builds in ‘Captain America’ sequel


“Captain America: The Winter Soldier” begins not with action, an alien invasion, or the arrival of an unstoppable villain, but instead with banter between Capt. Steve Rogers and Sam Wilson, the eventual high-flying Falcon.

Directors Anthony and Joe Russo set up their audience for a film highly focused on characters and their stories, not on unnecessary action spectacle. This decision is highly effective, because it allows the audience a chance to anticipate rather than become overwhelmed immediately, which was the case in “The Avengers.” Admittedly, “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” feeds viewers morsels of what’s to come only to further the previously mentioned anticipation. This might bother some, but I found it to be a refreshing approach to the superhero film formula.


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Robin Stroot Turning braiding process around


My recent column about making kumihimo braids gave instructions for the braiding process if you are turning the kumihimo foam template in a clockwise motion. If you want to turn the template in the more common way of a counter-clockwise motion, you will need to work the cords in the opposite order. So, once the cords are set up on the dotted areas, you will take the bottom left strand and pace it to the left of the two strands at the top of the kumihimo circle. You will now have three strands positioned at the top of the wheel.Read More>>>
Joyce OreAll sorts of signs when Easter is near


We don’t need a calendar to tell us Easter is near, for all our senses are on high alert. When the world seems younger and brighter with swaying daffodils, fuzzy chicks, woolly lambs and playful kittens, the grass is turning a from brown to green, and the sky is alive with flapping wings heading north, Easter is near.

When the sun is brighter, the morning’s warmer, the birds are singing melodious love song to their mates and the gardener can’t wait to begin digging in the soil, Easter is near.

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Russ Batenhorst Memories of when music recorded on vinyl


Nostalgia warning! The old guy is going to do a little reminiscing again. But this time, it’s on a topic inspired by today’s — well, actually tomorrow’s — headlines.

When I was a kid growing up in North Platte, a regular spot for us whenever we had a dollar burning a hole in our pockets was Murphy’s Modern Music. It was an all-around music supply store with instruments and sheet music and other supplies all around. But it was the record racks in the middle of the store that would draw in my friends and me. One dollar would buy you a “45.” Those were the smaller, vinyl records with one song on each side. One side would no doubt feature the hit we were there to buy, but now and then a hidden treasure would be found on the “B Side.”

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Tamera Schlueter Universally united by Easy Bake telescope


In the wee hours of Tuesday, Hunka Burnin’ Hubby and I froze our bums off while ogling the blood moon through an Orion Deep Space Explorer telescope. In the caliber of telescopes, it ranks up there with Dick Tracy decoder rings, Cracker Jack prizes, and Easy Bake ovens.

It was a Christmas gift for Hunka, purchased with great sacrifice 25 years ago during a time when “broke” would have been a fiscal improvement. We keep it around as a reminder of how far we’ve come, and how far we’ve yet to go.
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 Letter Policy
The Hastings Tribune welcomes letters about issues of the public interest. Here are some rules:

• Letters can be submitted by e-mail: 
        tribune@hastingstribune.com

•Letters may be hand delivered:
        908 W. Second Street,

• Or mailed to:
        Voice of the People
        P.O. Box 788,
        Hastings, NE 68902

• Letters must be signed and include an address
   and phone number. (The address and phone
   number will not be published.)

• Letters should be 300 words or less. Letters
   will be edited for length. They will also be
   edited for spelling, grammar, clarity and
   content.

• Letters should express an opinion or explain
   why something is important or in the public's
   interest.

 LAWMAKERS
Congress
  Deb Fischer, U.S. Senate
  383 Russell Senate Office Building
  Washington, D.C. 20510
  (202) 224-6551 • senator@bennelson.senate.gov

  Mike Johanns, U.S. Senate
  404 Russell Senate Office Building
  Washington, D.C. 20510
  (202) 224-4224
  mike_johanns@johanns.senate.gov

  Adrian Smith, U.S. House
  503 Cannon House
  Washington, D.C. 20515
  (202) 225-6435 • www.house.gov

  Area Nebraska senators

  Russ Karpisek, Wilber • District 32
  Room 1015, State Capitol
  Lincoln, NE 68509
  (402) 471-2711• rkarpisek@leg.ne.gov

  Les Seiler, Hastings • District 33
  Room 1523, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509
  (402) 471-2712 • lseiler@leg.ne.gov

  Annette Dubas, Fullerton • District 34
  Room 1018, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509
  (402) 471-2630 • adubas@leg.ne.gov

  Tom Carlson, Holdrege • District 38
  Room 1022, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509
  (402) 471-2732 • tcarlson@leg.ne.gov

  Dave Heineman, Governor
  Office of the Governor
  P.O. Box 94848, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509
  (402) 471-2244 • www.governor.nebraska.gov

 Hastings City Council
Ward 1
  Everett Goebel
  402-463-4063 • egoebel@cityofhastings.org
  Ginny Skutnik
 ginnyskutnik@cityofhastings.org
 

  Ward 2

  Sarah T. Hoops
  402-519-5040 • sarkatra@yahoo.com
  Michael Krings
  402-463-3130 • mkrings@cityofhastings.org
 

  Ward 3

  John Harrington
  402-462-8897 • jharrington@cityofhastings.org
  Kathy Peterson
  402-463-2756 • kpeterson@cityofhastings.org

 
Ward 4
  Chuck Niemeyer
  402-463-5179 • cniemeyer@cityofhastings.org
  Phil Odom
  402-463-4909 • podom@cityofhastings.org


 ADAMS COUNTY bRD. of supervisors
  District 1
  Lee Saathoff, Hastings • (402) 463-8151

  District 2

  Mike Weeks, Hastings • (402) 751-2546

  District 3

  Jack Hynes, Holstein • (402) 756-5023

  District 4

  Scott Thomsen, Hastings • (402) 463-9485

  District 5

  Dale Curtis, Hastings • (402) 463-3778

  District 6

  Chuck Neumann, Hastings • (402) 463-5471

  District 7

  Eldon Orthmann, Hastings • (402) 462-9846

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