What happened to progress

The political ads dominating TV channels lately are monotonous at best.

The candidates all try to convince you, the voter, that they are the most conservative. They promise to “kill” or repeal the Affordable Care Act (7 million people are now covered).

It was Ben Nelson, the senator from Nebraska who cast the final vote that made the Affordable Care Act the law of the land. He had courage and foresight, and realized the historic nature of what Congress was doing.

Nelson wanted to be on the right side of history, and he was.

What has happened to the progressive, positive and innovative politics in Nebraska?
Pete Ricketts hired Sarah Palin to show up: I wonder if Ricketts can see Russia from his house now?

Negativity and baseless claims dominate many of our politicians’ agendas, or those trying to influence voters from outside sources. They operate from a position blinded by narrow and prejudiced views.

Some even question the validity of the president, whom they claim wasn’t born in this country. This is not the Republican Party of Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan or, for that matter, George W. Bush.

When President George W. Bush flew to South Africa aboard Air Force One with President Barack Obama to attend the funeral of Nelson Mandela, the conversations must have been very interesting.

These two men know that building up is always better than tearing down. Positivity works and negativity doesn’t. Working together is how progress is made, and by doing so we will we remain the greatest country on earth.

Martin Miller
Hastings



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