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‘Hastings 150’
Hastings celebrates 150th anniversary at museum

C elebrating with cupcakes and cherry and grape Kool-Aid, the city of Hastings honored the community’s 150th birthday, as well as the opening of the Hastings Museum’s outdoor classroom Sept. 18.

Visitors filled the Hastings Museum as well as visited activities in the museum parking lot representing different city departments. Museum employees estimated more than 400 people were in attendance.

Museum director Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson and Mayor Corey Stutte spoke during a short program on the museum’s front lawn.

Kreutzer-Hodson said Hastings has a fairly typical settlement story.

“It’s not so much that as much as how Hastings has developed that has created a unique community,” she said.

The plat for the original town of Hastings was filed with the Adams County Register of Deeds on Oct. 15, 1872. The history of other Adams County towns and the county itself follow similar timelines.

The first official business of Adams County took place on Jan. 16, 1872.

The original town of Hastings extended from North Street, which is now Seventh Street, south to South Street and Burlington Avenue east to St. Joseph Avenue.

The crossing of two railroads — the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad and the St. Joseph and Denver City Railroad — is what really set into motion the development of Hastings.

Hastings was named for Thomas Del Monte Hastings, a construction engineer for the St. Joseph and Denver City Railroad, who was instrumental in building the railroad through Adams County.

BNSF Railway was the sponsor for Sunday’s event as well as the “Hastings 150” exhibit, which offered city staff members the opportunity to tell a personal story about any part of Hastings and the museum would incorporate an artifact or picture to go along with that.

“We can’t cover everything, but we’re covering little bits of pieces and parts,” Kreutzer-Hodson said. “We just want to give you a taste of what Hastings has provided, and we want to encourage you to pay attention to that history.”

“Hastings 150” will be on display through the end of the year.

In addition to city departments, representatives of the Adams County Historical Society and Hastings Tribune were on hand to talk about ongoing work on the book “Adams County, story continues: 1970-2021,” which should be available to the public by the end of the year.

Stutte, a Hastings native, said the community has gone through a lot of changes just during his lifetime.

Stutte, who is 40, recalled there not being a lot to do in downtown when he was growing up. The Imperial Mall was a much busier area.

“Over time, we’ve seen a great amount of development in downtown and now we’re seeing the mall area do that with the Theatre District,” he said.

With other projects like North Park Commons in north Hastings or the Heartwell Renewables planned biodiesel plant on the eastern edge of Hastings as well as half-cent sales tax projects and bond-funded school improvement projects, there is a lot to be proud of in Hastings.

“We’re 25,000 people strong,” Stutte said. “We’ve got great school districts, we have two great colleges. We have a lot of great things going on, and we have a very bright future in front of us. That’s mostly due to folks like yourselves. I’d just like to thank you for choosing Hastings as your place to live.”

Installing the museum’s outdoor classroom came about from the need to replace the concrete around the west side of the museum.

“We started thinking, if we have to redo the patio, what else can we do and we reimagined our entrance,” Kreutzer-Hodson said.

Museum staff members wanted something more natural and inviting.

They also wanted to create an outdoor classroom.

“Out nation is facing a deficit in nature for our children,” she said.

The outdoor classroom is a space to encourage exploration of the natural world through music, art, play and movement.

People of all ages can build with wooden blocks, create a masterpiece using natural objects, play games, make music and more.

“Nature classrooms are starting to be recognized as something that is very important for our children, as well as adults,” she said.

The outdoor classroom will be open on weekends and on the occasional weekday when local schools are out of session.

The museum will be using the outdoor classroom for Summer Fun classes.

The museum will launch its Nature Nuts program in 2023. The program will cover a variety of nature topics for people of all ages.to do special activity in the outdoor classroom.

Kreutzer-Hodson was pleased with the afternoon.

“I didn’t know what to expect, but I was hoping to get a good (attendance) and I think we have,” she said after the program. “There’s a lot of people who are spread out and are doing all the different tents and stuff. That’s a big difference that they’re hitting all of the areas and seeing the things the city does with them and for them.”


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‘Hastings 150’
Hastings celebrates 150th anniversary at museum

Celebrating with cupcakes and cherry and grape Kool-Aid, the city of Hastings honored the community’s 150th birthday, as well as the opening of the Hastings Museum’s outdoor classroom Sunday afternoon.

Visitors filled the Hastings Museum as well as visited activities in the museum parking lot representing different city departments. Museum employees estimated more than 400 people were in attendance.

therrman / Tony Herrman/Tribune/  

Mayor Corey Stutte speaks during the Hastings 150 celebration and dedication of the museum’s new outdoor classroom.

Museum director Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson and Mayor Corey Stutte spoke during a short program on the museum’s front lawn.

Kreutzer-Hodson said Hastings has a fairly typical settlement story.

“It’s not so much that as much as how Hastings has developed that has created a unique community,” she said.

The plat for the original town of Hastings was filed with the Adams County Register of Deeds on Oct. 15, 1872. The history of other Adams County towns and the county itself follow similar timelines.

The first official business of Adams County took place on Jan. 16, 1872.

The original town of Hastings extended from North Street, which is now Seventh Street, south to South Street and Burlington Avenue east to St. Joseph Avenue.

The crossing of two railroads — the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad and the St. Joseph and Denver City Railroad — is what really set into motion the development of Hastings.

Hastings was named for Thomas Del Monte Hastings, a construction engineer for the St. Joseph and Denver City Railroad, who was instrumental in building the railroad through Adams County.

BNSF Railway was the sponsor for Sunday’s event as well as the “Hastings 150” exhibit, which offered city staff members the opportunity to tell a personal story about any part of Hastings and the museum would incorporate an artifact or picture to go along with that.

therrman / Tony Herrman/Tribune/  

Hastings City Councilman Matt Fong and his daughter, Vivian, play on the music wall Sunday afternoon in the Hastings Museum’s new outdoor classroom.

“We can’t cover everything, but we’re covering little bits of pieces and parts,” Kreutzer-Hodson said. “We just want to give you a taste of what Hastings has provided, and we want to encourage you to pay attention to that history.”

“Hastings 150” will be on display through the end of the year.

In addition to city departments, representatives of the Adams County Historical Society and Hastings Tribune were on hand to talk about ongoing work on the book “Adams County, story continues: 1970-2021,” which should be available to the public by the end of the year.

Stutte, a Hastings native, said the community has gone through a lot of changes just during his lifetime.

Stutte, who is 40, recalled there not being a lot to do in downtown when he was growing up. The Imperial Mall was a much busier area.

“Over time, we’ve seen a great amount of development in downtown and now we’re seeing the mall area do that with the Theatre District,” he said.

With other projects like North Park Commons in north Hastings or the Heartwell Renewables planned biodiesel plant on the eastern edge of Hastings as well as half-cent sales tax projects and bond-funded school improvement projects, there is a lot to be proud of in Hastings.

therrman / Tony Herrman/therrman@hastingstribune.com/  

Hastings Museum employees, board members and foundation members participate in a ribbon cutting Sunday afternoon for the museum’s new outdoor classroom.

“We’re 25,000 people strong,” Stutte said. “We’ve got great school districts, we have two great colleges. We have a lot of great things going on, and we have a very bright future in front of us. That’s mostly due to folks like yourselves. I’d just like to thank you for choosing Hastings as your place to live.”

Installing the museum’s outdoor classroom came about from the need to replace the concrete around the west side of the museum.

“We started thinking, if we have to redo the patio, what else can we do and we reimagined our entrance,” Kreutzer-Hodson said.

Museum staff members wanted something more natural and inviting.

They also wanted to create an outdoor classroom.

“Out nation is facing a deficit in nature for our children,” she said.

The outdoor classroom is a space to encourage exploration of the natural world through music, art, play and movement.

People of all ages can build with wooden blocks, create a masterpiece using natural objects, play games, make music and more.

“Nature classrooms are starting to be recognized as something that is very important for our children, as well as adults,” she said.

The outdoor classroom will be open on weekends and on the occasional weekday when local schools are out of session.

The museum will be using the outdoor classroom for Summer Fun classes.

therrman / Tony Herrman/therrman@hastingstribune.com/  

Hastings Museum director Teresa Keutzer-Hodson speaking during the Hastings 150 celebration and dedication of the museum’s new outdoor classroom.

The museum will launch its Nature Nuts program in 2023. The program will cover a variety of nature topics for people of all ages.to do special activity in the outdoor classroom.

Kreutzer-Hodson was pleased with the afternoon.

“I didn’t know what to expect, but I was hoping to get a good (attendance) and I think we have,” she said after the program. “There’s a lot of people who are spread out and are doing all the different tents and stuff. That’s a big difference that they’re hitting all of the areas and seeing the things the city does with them and for them.”


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